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Tag Archives: The Johns

My Words as Weapons: Olenka’s Story

As mentioned a few “My Words as Weapons” posts back, I am reading Victor Malarek’s The Johns: Sex for Sale and the Men Who Buy It, a troubling read indeed. On pages 27-28 (yep, that’s about as far as my anger has allowed me to read so far) Malarek retells a story of Olenka who was a sex slave at a bar in Bosnia at the age of seventeen. Many of her “clients” were soldiers an UN peacekeepers.

Yes, there is a sick irony that those who were to protect and “keep the peace” were the ones raping Olenka and the other girls at the bar.  It’s just another horror of a sex slave’s life.  Who do they have to turn to?

They are alone.

They are forgotten.

They are abUSED.

And to most of the men who do it, these women are less than human.  Because if they allow the women to be anything more, these johns will know they are the monsters hiding under those girls’ metaphorical beds.

Olenka’s story reminded me of a movie I watched, and knowing it is based on a true story, I can only hope it’s the same story and not just another incident of the same abomination.  If you ever feel like getting angry, watch The Whistleblower with Rachel Weisz.

 

My Words as Weapons: The Johns

There is a book that has sat on my shelf for over a year now that I just haven’t been able to open up to read.  I want to, and I did finally get through the intro recently, but I know it will make me angry and disgusted.  However, I feel it’s an important book to read in order to understand what is really behind the sex trafficking trade.

Victor Malarek, an investigative journalist, takes a stand to blame men for prostitution, a fresh perspective.  One sentence from the book jacket reads:

Ranging worldwide, from the United States to Europe, and from Costa Rica to Thailand, Cambodia, Ukraine, he dispels the myths that justify prostitution and puts on display the rationales of ordinary johns, their beliefs, their behaviors, and their astounding brotherhood.

I am intrigued, and I hope some of this insight might be useful in developing a plan and education to slow down and end human trafficking.

I also found a great interview with the author, under ten minutes.

I am vowing to put more effort into reading this and will report more as I read and when I finish. Time to get started.